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20130801
20130831
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KQEH (PBS) 16
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English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
that day. >> we must get in this revolution, and complete the revolution. for in the delta of mississippi, in southwest georgia, the black belt of alabama, in harlem, in chicago, detroit, philadelphia, and all over this nation, the black masses are on the march for jobs and freedom. >> in the five decades since, john lewis has become an icon of the civil rights movement, a hero who faced down brutal southern police in the name of freedom and was beaten bloody for daring to do so. today, he is a 14-term congressman from georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis. and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to
: smiting goliath might as well be marshall ganz's job description. it began in mississippi's freedom summer of 1964 when his fury against injustice pulled him out of harvard and into the struggle for civil rights. from there, he signed on with the legendary cesar chavez and the united farm workers and for 16 years, struggled to unionize the men and women in the fields of california who toiled endless hours and mounting days, picking crops for next to nothing. three decades after marshall ganz had dropped out of harvard, he went back to finish his degree and earn a doctorate. a few years later, he was asked to become the architect behind the obama campaign's skillful organizing of students and volunteers. today, marshall ganz is a founder of the leading change network, a global community of organizers, educators and researchers mobilizing for democracy. you'll find more of his experience and philosophy in this book, "why david sometimes wins" marshall ganz, it's good to meet you. >> marshall ganz: it's good to meet you, bill. >> bill moyers: stories have been a powerful part of your life. wh
-- i'm sure other people have those influences, but being born in memphis, tennessee on the mississippi river, and having made my living playing down there on beale street, those particular elements created this booker t. jones style. tavis: so you know a bit about my back story. i know more about yours. but the reason why i love this instrument so much, this hammond b-3, is because long before i'd ever heard of ray charles, long before i heard of jimmy smith, i'm a kid growing up in a pentecostal church. >> oh, i see. tavis: so i fall in love with -- and i was choir director when i was -- people don't know this, but i was choir director of two choirs for years at my pentecostal church, -- [indiscernible] -- in indiana. so i fell in love with this instrument through the church. i raise that because you mentioned ray charles earlier, as did i, for that matter. but ray had a moment in his career where he was catching hell, for lack of a better phrase, for taking that instrument and taking that sound >> absolutely. tavis: and secularizing it. >> absolutely. tavis: did you have a similar jo
's not a pretty picture. here's just one example. three men on a summer's day in mississippi. why are they smiling and what are they really up to? yes, that's former president bill clinton on the right and on the left, his best friend forever, terry mcauliffe, former chairman of the democratic national committee, fundraiser supreme for both bill and hillary, and the personification of the corporate wing of the democratic party. smack in the middle, that's haley barbour, former chairman of the republican national committee. he made a fortune lobbying for corporations, especially for the ta backco industry, then went home to serve two terms as governor of mississippi, and couldn't wait to get back to washington, where once again, he's gun-slinging for the big boys. so why did these three d.c. desperadoes ride into a small mississippi town? seems that when barbour was governor, he offered mcauliffe a very attractive state package of price and tax subsidies for a plant there to build electric cars for his greentech automotive company. mcauliffe also tapped his politically connected network for more th
is by no means at the heart of all of the chapters. there is mississippi. there is one chapter about the pivotal year, 1964, freedom summer. bob moses. they are trying to outlaw segregation. dr. king is in jail in st. augustine, florida, and in that one summer, partisan politics turned upside down in the united states. the democrats went to the party of south segregation that they had been for a century. usurping states' rights and a sign of tyranny in the government. the first republicans popped up in the south, and the party of lincoln gave way to the party of presumptive white people, so it turned partisan politics on its head in one summer. between the far reaches of texas and the atlantic ocean in 1964, the very first ones came up. the chapter right in the middle shows how the power of race and the power of this movement really drove partisan politics in ways that people do not appreciate today. that is part of our misremembering. we do not want to remember how powerful a force race can be in our politics. tavis: this was really one of the greatest movements, but what does your study of thi
oxford, mississippi, they had the violence down there to keep black students out. george wallace stood in the schoolhouse door. king was a march for jobs and freedom but that didn't produce the civil rights accident. what produced it, john, was the death of john f. kennedy a couple months later when he was assassinated and linden johnson's presidency and building on that movement to pass the civil rights act, and then selma produced the voting rights act. but let me say this john. there was a downside in that decade, too. snick was no longer led by john lewis but h rap brown and stokley carmichael. you had the riots in watts in '65. dr. king was shot, a hundred cities burned, including washington, d.c. i was in nixon's campaign. the whole issue was law and order in america, and at one point nixon and wallace together had almost 70% of the national vote. >> eleanor. >> well, that was quite a trip through history, thank you. but nixon and wallace together culminate in the southern strategy where you take political exploitation of the plight, if you will, of blacks in the south, and when
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)